Bible Code Digest: May/June 2006 Continued

G-d: I Shall Erase the Song
A Lengthy Bible Code Portends the Flatness of the Movie


Among the codes found regarding The Da Vinci Code film, the following code is particularly intriguing, given the reviews the film has received since its opening at the Cannes Film Festival.


Hey, Oh daughter of SONY, sing! "Not the time." Echo, be accurate!
Ha, Ha, Ha. G-d: "I shall erase (the) song."


Skip = -7, R Factor = 34.300, Start = Genesis 4:15:9, End = Genesis 4:9:44


Since Columbia is owned by SONY, it would seem poetic to refer to Columbia Pictures as a daughter of SONY. Commanding Columbia to sing makes sense for a company known for its records, tapes and CDs. In a real sense, the movie is an echo of the novel. The echo is being exhorted to be accurate seems descriptive of the efforts of many to point out alleged inaccuracies and distortions in the "historical" basis of Dan Brown's novel. Laughter follows the exhortation to be accurate seems to imply that whoever is speaking believes that the inaccuracies of the echo (movie?) are so blatant as to be laughable. (Note: During the first showing of the film at Cannes, the audience laughed following the pivotal serious moment in the film.) The code ends with G-d saying, I shall erase the song, leaves one with the impression that, whatever the song is, G-d will neutralize it.

Given our initial thoughts on the meaning of the code, we find that the following movie reviews reinforce our speculations.
    And now the circus goes quiet. In the hush, under the spotlight, after 40 days and 40 nights of manufactured hype and impassioned controversy (or is it the other way around?), stands a small, surprisingly ordinary movie . . . it's an acceptable but uninspired simulacrum: an overly faithful multiplex translation of a very, very popular airport novel.

    The Hollywood alchemists haven't turned gold to lead. They've turned copper to zinc.

    The Boston Globe

*****

    How can a film contain so many clues yet remain utterly clueless? The screen adaptation of "The Da Vinci Code" treats the Dan Brown novel with a reverence it does not deserve and from which it does not benefit . . .

    It's doubtful anyone who went for the book will hit the nearest Victorian fainting couch over the movie, unless it's for a wee nap to shake off a headache . . .

    The movie version is so intent on taking its mystical and religious business seriously, at an overfull 2 hours, it forgets to be entertaining. And it sets some sort of record for number of endings in a single picture. I counted 666. Wait a minute. Isn't that number some sort of symbol?

    Chicago Tribune

*****

    Holy controversy, it's . . . underwhelming! . . .

    But the real mystery is why the movie isn't more exciting . .

    E! Online

*****

    The surprise, and disappointment, of The Da Vinci Code is how slipshod and hokey the religious detective story now seems.

    Entertainment Weekly

*****

    Their adaptation remains so faithful it borders on bland.

    FilmCritic.com

*****

    But the movie is so drenched in dialogue musing over arcane mythological and historical lore and scenes grow so static that even camera movement can't disguise the dramatic inertia.

    HollywoodReporter.com

*****

    So I certainly can't support any calls for boycotting or protesting this busy, trivial, inoffensive film. Which is not to say I'm recommending you go see it.

    New York Times

*****

    There's no code to decipher. Da Vinci is a dud -- a dreary, droning, dull-witted adaptation of Dan Brown's religioso detective story that sold 50 million copies worldwide. Conservative elements in the Catholic Church are all worked up over a plot that questions Christ's divinity and posits a Vatican conspiracy to cover up Jesus Christ's alleged marriage to Mary Magdalene and to drive all things feminine from the church. Here's the sure way to quiet the protesters: Have them see the movie. They will fall into a stupor in minutes. I know it bored me breathless . . .

    As the movie gets swallowed up in its own stilted verbosity, I kept thinking that it would work better as one of those audiobooks. Just don't listen to it while driving. You might get drowsy and hit a tree.

    Rolling Stone

*****

    "The Da Vinci Code," the film version of Dan Brown's enormous best-seller, should have been the thinking person's thrill ride. Just looked at as a piece of story construction, the movie's plot is a thing of beauty, with some immediate danger always pressing in on the characters, and some gigantic riddle always in the process of revealing itself. There are reversals of expectation, miraculous escapes from certain doom -- all the things that make thrillers thrilling. But "The Da Vinci Code" isn't thrilling . . .

    . . . Audiences tend to measure the grandeur of the story by noting its effect on the protagonist. Perhaps that's why, for all the Paris and London locations, for all the grainy flashbacks to medieval times, for all the insistence of the soundtrack, one comes away from "The Da Vinci Code" feeling that, whatever happened, it didn't add up to much.

    San Francisco Chronicle

*****

Toothless Tiger

While there are a few critics praising the film, by and large, critics have found the film to be ineffective. Our Director Ed Sherman described the film as a "toothless tiger" and found that it simply didn't work as either a thiller or a plausible exposé of Catholicism.

In light of the controversy over the book and the great anticipation of the film (particularly with the likes of Ron Howard and Tom Hanks on board), the film itself has proven to be a great critical disappointment. One could say that the expected power of the story has been "erased."


Continue to Moshe Shak's The Da Vinci Code article

Continue to Venturing Beyond The Da Vinci Code











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